Walk with Mercy in Peru: A Photographic Timeline

October 12, 2015

By Sister Deborah Watson

Sisters of Mercy from the United States were among those who responded to the Church’s call for more missionaries to Latin America.

1 - Chicago

Credit: Mercy Heritage Center

The first four sisters to go to Peru from the United States were sponsored by the Chicago Province of the Union and arrived in Sicuani, near Cusco, Peru, in 1961.  The mission was closed in 1969 largely due to problems with the government. Ministries were left in the hands of Peruvians.

2 - Burlingame sisters depart

The second Mercy group arrived from Burlingame, California, in early 1964 to minister to the Aymara people of the Prelature of Juli, Puno, Peru.

3 - Sister Regina

Credit: Mercy Heritage Center

Their many ministries included education. In this photo, Sister Regina Marie Bayley prepares catechists.

4 - Sister Barbara C

Sister Barbara Cavanaugh, pictured above, was one of the first to live among the people as midwife and helped promote women’s integral development.

6 - Sister Rose DalleTezze

Credit: Mercy Heritage Center

In 1967 the Pittsburgh Congregation sent sisters to Chimbote, Peru, on the coast North of Lima. In the photo above, one of these sisters, Sister Rose Dalle Tezze, stands with school students at Parroquia Virgen de la Puerta.

Betty
Sister Betty Carroll—who served as president of Carlow College, of the Pittsburgh Regional Community and of LCWR—took up residence in Chimbote at the age of 69. She spent 16 years advocating for women’s rights and dignity and collaborating with other women to found Casa de la Mujer.

7 - Mary Klock

In 1983 sisters arrived in the newly formed Diocese of Chulucanas, to minister in Pacaipampa, a remote mountain area frequently accessible only by mule. In this photo, Sister Mary Klock prepares to saddle up!

8 - Pat Mulderick

Credit: Mercy Heritage Center

Sister Patricia Mulderick with children in Pacaipampa.

9 - Connie H

Credit: Mercy Heritage Center

Sister Connie Haughton converses with a village woman in Pacaipampa.

10 - sewing skills

The approach to ministry in Peru has developed and grown through the years. Centro Betania in Chulucanas provides multiple services, especially for women, and provides education on pressing issues such as the trafficking of persons. Women also learn marketable skills such as sewing and cooking.

11 - seed money

Centro Betania also provides seed money for domestic animals and self-development opportunities for rural women.

13 - CASA de la mujer

Sister Blanca Quintana prepares for a workshop in Chimbote at Casa de la Mujer.

Sister Gloria Miller visits the Kantuta Knitting Group in Puno, Peru, where women create beautiful knitted goods to be marketed as far away as California. Their finger puppets are especially popular!  Credit: Sister Deborah Watson

Sister Gloria Miller visits the Kantuta Knitting Group in Puno, Peru, where women create beautiful knitted goods to be marketed as far away as California. Their finger puppets are especially popular!  Credit: Sister Deborah Watson

Wherever they are, current community members actively promote and accompany women who express interest in living Mercy spirituality as vowed members, associates or collaborators. For example, two Mercy sisters in Peru recently led a mission experience for five university students, to share with these young women the experience of living as Sisters of Mercy. See photos from their experience!

 

Share This Story

Comments (2)

Add A Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


  1. Mary Ann Connolly

    How wonderful to see the picture of Betty Carroll! I have many happy memories of her in Chimbote.


  2. Marie Carlin

    yes- it was wonderful to see Sister Betty Carroll- I lived with her in PGH and loved and admired her so much- she has been a great and positive influence in my life and continues to inspire me in my ministry to the poor and to prisoners