Search Results for: Becoming a Sister of Mercy

Reflections on Becoming a Catholic Sister

Every woman hears God’s call uniquely. Read our stories of how we became Sisters of Mercy.

Advent 2016 blog series from the Sisters of Mercy of the America

The Fourth Week of Advent: A Time for Hopeful Waiting

December 16, 2016

By Sister Debbie-Ann Chambers, apostolic novice

“The true light that gives light to everyone was coming into the world” (John 1:9). This year, as we await the coming of the light of Christ, we invite you to reflect on the meaning of Advent through diverse perspectives in our Mercy family. This reflection for the fourth week of Advent is written by Sister Debbie-Ann, a Mercy apostolic novice from Jamaica. Read other reflections in our 2016 Advent series.

hope (1)If you asked me to define Advent, I would say that it is a time of hopeful waiting.

If you also asked me what I am waiting for, or how I am waiting with hope, I’d probably feel a stirring in my heart and tell you of my life’s passion. I would say, I am waiting for the Kingdom of God—for right relationships and freedom for the poor and the captive.

In this time of overwhelming oppression of the poor, racial and ethnic discrimination and all other sorts of prejudice, you might confide in me that you are struggling with hope. I would listen and empathize with the difficulty of living our “already but not yet” belief in the Kingdom of God. Then, I would share this with you: hope, I have learned from my favorite writer, Paulo Freire, is not a wishy-washy virtue, a frivolous illusion or an act of wishful thinking. It is commitment to struggle and a commitment to looking for the opportunities for transformation, no matter the obstacles.   Read More »

Bringing Language Arts Alive

October 6, 2016

By Karel Lucander

Sister Carol Louise with her eighth-grade students at St. Clement School.

Sister Carol Louise with her eighth-grade students at St. Clement School.

Engaging middle school students can be a challenge, but it’s one that Sister Carol Louise Inderhees relishes. She has kept academics alive for 45 years, since she began her teaching ministry. Currently, she teaches seventh- and eighth-graders in an accelerated language arts/literature class at St. Clement School in Cincinnati, Ohio, where she also serves as a mentor for beginning teachers. Staying open to change is one of the toughest facets of her ministry.

“As a teacher, I have to be open to developing classes that will challenge yet not frustrate the students. Students need to know upfront the expectations and that I will challenge them to reach not only academic goals but also their own personal goals. While flexibility and adaptability are important, teaching from an understanding heart is an essential component. Students need to know they are cared for as unique individuals and that, together, we are partners on their academic journey,” she says. “A former student attested to this when she stated, ‘… I had a guide, a teacher, a coach who set me on my path … step by step, into the stars, the moon, the clouds, and the sun … and so I fly now not alone but with my teacher.’”   Read More »

Everyday “Yeses” Lead to Mercy

March 17, 2016

By Amanda LePoire

Kelly finds her service as unit secretary in the Emergency Department of Mercy Hospital “an eye-opening experience.”

Kelly finds her service as unit secretary in the Emergency Department of Mercy Hospital “an eye-opening experience.”

Despite growing up with Sisters of Mercy living on her the street, going to a Mercy high school, and attending college just minutes from Mercy administrative offices, Kelly Williams didn’t see herself becoming a Sister of Mercy. Now, as she finishes her candidacy and prepares to become a novice, she knows that Mercy is home.

“The more time I spent with the Mercys, the more I knew this is where I’m called to be,” says Kelly. She had hesitated to consider Mercy because she associated the sisters with health care, which she didn’t want as a ministry. Despite her reservations, she’s served as unit secretary at the Mercy Hospital – St. Louis (Missouri) Emergency Department since August 2014.   Read More »

Sisters of Mercy commit their lives to God

“I Love Being a Sister of Mercy”

January 8, 2016

By Sister Jackie Nedd

Sister Jackie (right) with Sister Cora Marie Billings.

Sister Jackie (right) with Sister Cora Marie Billings.

I grew up in a Christian home and learned the gospel values from my grandparents, parents, aunts and uncles, who incorporated these values into the fabric of their lives. My parents always read or told me stories from the Bible and encouraged me to be charitable and to love my brother and sisters. When I was about six years old I learned how great God’s love is for me and how God gave up His son, Jesus Christ, for me to have everlasting life. The question about how I can repay God for his love to me started to form in my little mind. As I prepared for my First Communion, I learned about the Ten Commandments and heard God’s call to love and serve Him and my neighbors. I prayed for the grace of the Holy Spirit to love others the way God loves me. I looked to my parents for examples of how to love God and saw how very hospitable, charitable and compassionate they were towards others and how committed they were to their faith. We faithfully attended Sunday Mass and the Advent Novena at Our Lady of Immaculate Conception Roman Catholic Church at home in Guyana.   Read More »

Wake up the World! 2015 is the Year of Consecrated Life.

Sister-Siblings Celebrate Year of Consecrated Life with Special Bond

November 30, 2015

By Catherine Walsh, Sisters of Mercy – Northeast Community

At one time it was not uncommon for two or more daughters from a single family to become religious sisters. Sisters Theresa and Ruth Conlogue, who are retired educators in Portland, Maine, reflected recently on the Year of Consecrated Life and the “double closeness” they share as sister-siblings.

The Conlogue children. Eugene is in front; from left in the second row are Marie, Janette, Joan holding Ruth (later Sister Ruth), Bette and Theresa (later Sister Theresa).

The Conlogue children. Eugene is in front; from left in the second row are Marie, Janette, Joan holding Ruth (later Sister Ruth), Bette and Theresa (later Sister Theresa).

Seven Conlogue siblings—six girls and a boy—knelt on the kitchen floor in their rural Maine home every evening in the 1930s as their mother led them in the rosary. For Sister Theresa Conlogue, 83, and Sister Ruth Conlogue, 77, this memory is not only vivid, but it also continues to shape the more than 110 combined years of religious life they have shared in Mercy.

“We often said that our mother had more faith in one little finger than anyone else had in their whole body,” says Sister Theresa. “From our parents’ example we learned that God is very good to us and that we in turn need to help others.”   Read More »

An Unusual Path to Mercy

November 5, 2015

By Beth Rogers Thompson

Sister Susie Dandison ministers as an interpreter for Spanish speakers in Davie County, North Carolina, often accompanying them to medical appointments.

Sister Susie Dandison ministers as an interpreter for Spanish speakers in Davie County, North Carolina, often accompanying them to medical appointments.

By the time Teresa Susana Dandison became Sister Susie, she had raised four children. Like many sisters, she met the Sisters of Mercy at a Catholic school—her children’s.

Born in Argentina, she married at age 17. Her husband, John, also was an Argentinian native, but his parents were British and Irish, so she began to pick up the English language from her in-laws. For several years, the couple lived in England, where John worked at the Argentine Embassy.

In 1954, they visited friends in the United States, planning to stay only a few years and then return to Argentina. Instead, they ended up settling in Salisbury, North Carolina, across the street from Sacred Heart School. That’s where Sister Susie met Sister Pauline Clifford, a mentor whose memory still causes her to tear up with emotion. Read More »

A Novice’s Adventure to See Pope Francis

September 30, 2015

By Sister Patricia Anne, Sister of Mercy novice

During Pope Francis’ historic visit to the United States, seven Sisters of Mercy novices were invited to attend the canonization Mass of Junipero Serra, held on September 23 at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, D.C.

Pope Francis entering the basilica—a Mercy novice was able to snap this incredible picture!

Pope Francis entering the basilica—a Mercy novice was able to snap this incredible picture!

When I heard the news that I was to be in attendance for the pope’s visit to Washington, D.C., I was elated. I had just been received into the Mercy community as a novice when I received the phone call from my incorporation minister, Sister Jill Weber. What great news this was to share with my local community.

Spring forward now to the day of departure for Washington D.C. We gathered and headed for the airport; everyone was abuzz and excited to catch even the smallest glimpse of Pope Francis the next day. Once we arrive in Washington we are greeted warmly by the sisters in the local area and housed for the evening. With their warm hospitality everyone settled in for the evening. I have to admit I managed to be awake later than usual due to the upcoming excitement that the next day was to bring! I knew that the day was to be long, but for me this was going to be a once-in-a-lifetime event. After all, how often do you get to stand in the presence of the current pontiff?    Read More »

Is There a “Francis Effect” for Vocations?

September 8, 2015

By Sister Cynthia Serjak

Bohumil Petrik/Catholic News Agency

Bohumil Petrik/Catholic News Agency

Not long after Pope Francis was elected, people began to wonder if there would be a positive effect on vocations because of the new spirit that the new pontiff was bringing to the Church. Before I discuss any actual numbers, here are some thoughts about how Pope Francis is assisting our vocational efforts.

One theme that permeates the pope’s writings and speeches is the call to direct our attention to those on the margins. His decision this past summer to visit the poorest countries in South America was just one example of his intention to draw the Church’s and the world’s attention to the plight of those on the edges of our societies. This matches well with the Sisters of Mercy’s vibrant intention to bring into focus for the larger society those who are without adequate shelter, education and health care.  Many of the women who contact us about considering religious life express a great desire to be of service to those in need. Sharing this same message, Francis may help God to touch the hearts of those women.   Read More »

Sister Taryn Stark Reflects on Her Steps to Mercy

July 28, 2015

By Liz Dossa

Sister Taryn

Sister Taryn

Sister Taryn Stark’s dark eyes glowed with excitement as she talked several weeks before her perpetual profession ceremony. She had prepared for seven years for this day when she would profess perpetual vows—the final step in becoming a Sister of Mercy.

Looking back, her steps toward religious life seem clear and direct. She knew the Mercy Sisters as a young child when her mother, Ruth, a graduate student at the time, was close friends with them. She was baptized at the convent chapel in Burlingame, California, during the Mass when her mother became a Catholic in 1978.

As her mother traveled the world working for the World Health Organization and Catholic Relief Services in Fiji, South Africa and Peru, she always sought out the Sisters of Mercy. Ruth shared a sense of community and vision with the sisters. This example of trying to serve the world’s most needy deeply impressed Taryn. “I grew up with a mother who taught me to treat every creature on earth with respect, all people, even if I have been mistreated by them. Even the spider which might have bitten me.”   Read More »

Wake up the World! 2015 is the Year of Consecrated Life.

Getting to Know Mercy

June 30, 2015

By Marissa, Mercy Candidate

On June 20, the Sisters of Mercy came together in celebration and prayer to welcome Marissa as a candidate with the Sisters of Mercy. Marissa will now begin two years living in community as she prepares for life as a sister. Marissa reflects here about her call to Mercy:

Marissa is welcomed into the Sisters of Mercy. From left: Sister Anne Murphy, Marissa and Sister Laura Reicks.

Marissa is welcomed into the Sisters of Mercy. From left: Sister Anne Murphy, Marissa and Sister Laura Reicks.

I came to know Mercy as an undergraduate student at Mount Mercy University [in Cedar Rapids, Iowa]. At first, I ran away from it. When I chose Mount Mercy I had no idea there was a religious community associated with the university, let alone the convent being right there on the campus. When I learned that, I thought the only way to be part of Mercy was to be a nun. I did not come to college to become a nun, so I escaped by telling myself my only purpose there was to attain a degree.     Read More »