Connect with Mercy

The more things change…the more we need to ask the questions why

May 24, 2019

By Sister Ana María Siufi and Sister Janet Korn

When the Extended Justice Team gathered in March, we had the opportunity to reflect on current events, specifically in Latin America. These conversations are the microcosms of what the internationality of the Sisters of Mercy of the Americas means, as well as our commitment to delve deeper into the root causes of the injustices we see through our news and social media channels. There is always more beneath the surface, and the firsthand experience of sisters and associates forces us to keep asking important questions.

A rally in Venezuela
A rally in Venezuela
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Cuanto más cambian las cosas. . . más hay que preguntarnos el por qué

May 24, 2019

Por la Hermana Ana María Siufi y la Hermana Janet Korn

Cuando el Equipo Ampliado de Justicia se reunió en marzo, tuvimos la oportunidad de reflexionar en eventos de actualidad, específicamente en Latinoamérica. Estas conversaciones son el microcosmos de la internacionalidad de las Hermanas de la Misericordia de las Américas, así como nuestro compromiso en profundizar las causas fundamentales de las injusticias que vemos a través de nuestras noticias y redes sociales. Siempre hay algo más debajo de la superficie, y la experiencia directa de las hermanas y asociadas/os nos obliga a hacernos preguntas importantes.

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Who Are the Companions in Mercy?

May 21, 2019

By Cynthia Sartor, Companion in Mercy

When trying to define the Companions in Mercy, it is sometimes easier to refer to the medieval tradition of the Beguines. They were a group of women who formed a community based on a shared spirituality. Although they did not take canonically recognized vows, they committed themselves to lives of prayer, service, a simple lifestyle and support of one another. Members of some Beguines lived together; members of others lived separate lives but always with the commitment of shared prayer and service.

The first Companions in Mercy in 2005. (from L-R: Kate Grant, Kathy Garbarino, Connie MacMurray, Sue Lavoie, Sue Kamler and Rita O'Dea)
The first Companions in Mercy in 2005. (from L-R: Kate Grant, Kathy Garbarino, Connie MacMurray, Sue Lavoie, Sue Kamler and Rita O’Dea)
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¿Quiénes son las Compañeras en Misericordia?

May 21, 2019

Por Cynthia Sartor, Compañera en Misericordia

Cuando se trata de definir a las Compañeras en Misericordia, a veces es más fácil referirse a la tradición medieval de las Beguinas. Ellas fueron un grupo de mujeres que formaron una comunidad basada en la espiritualidad compartida. Si bien no hacen votos canónicos reconocidos, se comprometen a una vida de oración, servicio, un estilo de vida sencillo y a apoyarse mutuamente. Algunas de las Beguinas viven juntas; otras viven por separado pero siempre con el compromiso de compartir la oración y el servicio.

Las primeras Compañeras en Misericordia en 2005. (de izquierda a derecha: Kate Grant, Kathy Garbarino, Connie MacMurray, Sue Lavoie, Sue Kamler y Rita O'Dea)
Las primeras Compañeras en Misericordia en 2005. (de izquierda a derecha: Kate Grant, Kathy Garbarino, Connie MacMurray, Sue Lavoie, Sue Kamler y Rita O’Dea)
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Sister Martha Milner keeps ‘fighting the good fight’ in Mississippi

May 16, 2019

By Karel Lucander

Sister Martha (left) and Gabrielle Brown, Mercy Housing and Human Development (MHHD) counselor, discuss the Mercy Housing Homebuyer Education clients who have qualified for home ownership.
Sister Martha (left) and Gabrielle Brown, Mercy Housing and Human Development (MHHD) counselor, discuss the Mercy Housing Homebuyer Education clients who have qualified for home ownership.

Born and raised in Mississippi, Sister Martha Milner has stood up against racism as far back as she can remember. At 15, she drove some dear friends—who happened to be black—home from school. In response, the Ku Klux Klan adorned her family’s front yard with a burning cross. This incident, along with others that her friends and neighbors endured, ignited Martha’s lifelong battle against ignorance and prejudice. “I can smell racial discrimination, whether obvious or hidden. And I can be fierce when I encounter racism or misogynism. I have no fear; I’ll go in where fools fear to tread. My family was like that, especially my mom,” says Martha.

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Mercy Students’ Refugee Encounter

May 14, 2019

By Bob Bonnici, religion teacher, Mercy McAuley High School.

“How will we communicate?” asked one of my students as we prepared to meet several newly arrived refugees that Catholic Charities of Southwest Ohio was helping to resettle in Cincinnati.

Mercy McAuley students working with a man to help him learn vital life skills for a newly resettled refugee.
Mercy McAuley students working with a man to help him learn vital life skills for a newly resettled refugee.

Over the Easter Break, fellow religion teacher Michael Infantine and I accompanied 10 of our students to the local Catholic Charities Office to assist Rachel Burgess, the case management supervisor of the Refugee Resettlement Program. For two days, our students met and interacted with families from all over the world looking to make a new start in America.

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Encuentro de estudiantes de la Escuela Secundaria de la Misericordia McAuley con refugiados

May 14, 2019

Por Bob Bonnici, Profesor, Mercy McAuley High School.

«¿Cómo nos comunicaremos?», preguntó una de mis estudiantes mientras nos preparábamos para conocer a varios refugiados recién llegados que Caridades Católicas del Sudoeste de Ohio estaba ayudando a reasentarse en Cincinnati.

Durante las vacaciones de Pascua, el profesor de religión Michael Infantine y yo acompañamos a 10 de nuestras estudiantes a la Oficina de Caridades Católicas local para ayudar a Rachel Burgess, la supervisora de administración de casos del Programa de Reasentamiento de Refugiados. Durante dos días, nuestras estudiantes se reunieron e interactuaron con familias de todo el mundo buscando comenzar una nueva vida en Estados Unidos.

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Sisters and Brothers at the Door

May 10, 2019

By Sister Marilyn Morgan

Very early in the morning of March 31, I left for McAllen, Texas, to join nine others for a Border Witness Program sponsored by the Institute Justice Team. There were three Sisters of Mercy in the group—Phuong Dong, Joanne Whitaker and me—and nine lay staff/associates. We were led by Maggie Conley, director of the Institute Justice Team, and later joined by Jean Stokan, Institute justice coordinator for immigration and nonviolence. We spent a week at the border with our home base at the different sites of ARISE, a ministry cosponsored by Mercy that helps immigrants in the area become self-sufficient.

The Border Witness Program delegation stands outside ARISE, a ministry for migrants in McAllen, Texas.
The Border Witness Program delegation stands outside ARISE, a ministry for migrants in McAllen, Texas.
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Hermanas y hermanos a la puerta

May 10, 2019

Por Hermana Marilyn Morgan

Muy temprano por la mañana del 31 de marzo, salí hacia McAllen, Texas para unirme a otras nueve personas del programa Testigos de la Frontera patrocinado por el Equipo de Justicia del Instituto. Había tres Hermanas de la Misericordia en el grupo: Phuong Dong, Joanne Whitaker y yo, y nueve miembros del personal laico/ asociadas. Nos dirigió Maggie Conley, directora del Equipo de Justicia del Instituto, y después se unió Jean Stokan, coordinadora de justicia del Instituto para inmigración y no violencia. Dedicamos una semana a la frontera teniendo como base diferentes sitios de ARISE, un servicio copatrocinado por la Misericordia que ayuda a inmigrantes en el área a llegar a ser autosuficientes.

Foto del grupo en el programa de Testigos de la Frontera frente a ARISE, un servicio para inmigrantes en McAllen, Texas.
Foto del grupo en el programa de Testigos de la Frontera frente a ARISE, un servicio para inmigrantes en McAllen, Texas.
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In Life, Looking Is Not The Same As Seeing

May 7, 2019

By Sister Victoria Incrivaglia

I have learned that what is planned as your intention is not always what you will receive. This is specifically true when applied to photography.

The Great Blue Heron that Sister Victoria saw with her camera.
The Great Blue Heron that Sister Victoria saw with her camera.

I am currently on sabbatical studying photography, which teaches many lessons, including being open to the present moment. In addition to learning the mechanics, I am also focusing on contemplative photography, which is more than a mechanical process; it is being open to seeing the natural inspiration of your surroundings. The technical and mechanical parts require learning the skills and language: bokeh, ISO, aperture, etc. The contemplative aspect is coming to understand and practice the reality that looking is not the same as seeing.

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