Connect with Mercy

Encuentro: Reflecting on Border Immersion Experience, part 1

January 16, 2018

From November 6-10, the Sisters of Mercy sponsored the second annual Border Immersion Experience, an event at the U.S.-Mexico border where participants witnessed some of the conditions experienced by immigrants on the southern border. We’ll be sharing their reflections in two parts. Today we hear from Sister Eileen Trainor and Sister Rita Valade.

Why? by Sister Eileen Trainor

Sister Eileen Trainor stands at the Rio Grande in El Paso, Texas.

Sister Eileen Trainor stands at the Rio Grande in El Paso, Texas.

A father and son were riding in a bus. The young boy looked out the window and asked his father: “Why do they have so much, and we have so little?” They were in Juarez, Mexico, riding along the border of El Paso, Texas. Why?

For many years I have worked with people who are materially poor in a soup kitchen, shelter for homeless, center for immigrants and agency assisting formerly incarcerated women and their children. After meeting so many people on a personal level, my mind and soul say, “Why?” What is causing this poverty to be a reality? The connection between direct service and systemic injustice runs long and deep. Read More »

“A Place Where I Felt Safe”—Casa Misericordia Offers Shelter and Security for Victims of Domestic Violence

January 12, 2018

The Sisters of Mercy stand in solidarity with our immigrant and refugee brothers and sisters. This blog post is part of week-long focus on Mercy and immigration, including historical accounts of the sisters’ roots as immigrants in the 19th century as well as a look at Mercy ministries, past and present, serving our immigrant and refugee sisters and brothers. Visit the webpage for Mercy for Immigrants to learn more.

Maria* writes:

My baby was four months old, and my son was four years old. My son was diagnosed with dyslexia, autism and ADHD. My husband did not want to accept that our son was ill. This caused many of our fights and much of my beatings.

The manager of the apartment complex where I lived came by to see me and found me all beat up and called the police for me. Through her I found that a place existed where I could get help. A place where I felt safe. I was so afraid and embarrassed and did not know what the future was going to look like.

Sister Rosemary with a woman at Casa de Misericordia.

Sister Rosemary visits with a woman at Casa de Misericordia.

The police brought Maria and her children to Casa Misericordia, a shelter for victims of domestic violence in Laredo, Texas. Seventy-five to 80 percent of the women at Casa are undocumented, and their immigration issues often compound their domestic situations, says Sister Rosemary Welsh, executive director of Casa.

“Sometimes the abuser is a U.S. permanent resident or a citizen, and they hold that over their victim, threatening to call immigration and take away her children. Sometimes the victims worry about their future if they leave, since without papers they have no way to earn money and feed their kids. And sometimes the victims are afraid to call the police, fearing they will be deported if the police find out they are undocumented,” Sister Rosemary explained.

A New Beginning

But once a victim comes to Casa, her life begins to change. It is the only domestic violence shelter in the area which welcomes women who are pregnant and provides counseling services. Additionally, Casa’s staff connect the women to a variety of resources: job training, “know your rights” classes, immigration legal aid and more.   Read More »

«Un lugar donde me sentí segura» – Casa Misericordia ofrece amparo y seguridad para víctimas de violencia doméstica

January 12, 2018

Las Hermanas de la Misericordia se solidarizan con nuestros hermanos y hermanas inmigrantes y refugiados. Esta publicación blog es parte de una serie especial de publicaciones de una semana sobre la Misericordia e inmigración, que incluye relatos históricos de las raíces de las hermanas como inmigrantes en el siglo XIX, así como una mirada a los ministerios de la Misericordia, pasados y presentes, sirviendo a nuestros hermanos y hermanas inmigrantes y refugiados. ¿Deseas saber más? Visita la página Misericordia para inmigrantes.

María* escribe:

Mi bebé tenía cuatro meses y mi hijo tenía cuatro años. A mi hijo, lo diagnosticaron con dislexia, autismo y TDAH (Trastorno por Déficit de Atención e Hiperactividad). Mi esposo no quiso aceptar que nuestro hijo estuviera enfermo. Esto causó muchas de nuestras peleas y muchas palizas.

La gerente de los apartamentos donde vivía fue a verme y me encontró golpeada y llamó a la policía. A través de ella, supe que había un lugar donde me podían ayudar. Un lugar donde me sentía segura. Tenía tanto miedo y estaba tan avergonzada y no sabía cómo sería el futuro.

Hermana Rosemary visita a una mujer en la Casa Misericordia.

Hermana Rosemary visita a una mujer en la Casa Misericordia.

La policía llevó a María y a sus hijos a Casa Misericordia, un albergue para víctimas de violencia doméstica en Laredo, Texas. De setenta y cinco a ochenta por ciento de las mujeres en la Casa no tienen documentos y sus problemas de inmigración muchas veces hacen más difíciles su situación doméstica, dice la Hermana Rosemary Welsh, directora ejecutiva de la Casa.

«A veces el abusador es residente permanente de Estados Unidos o ciudadano y amenaza a la víctima que va a llamar a las autoridades de inmigración y quitarle sus hijos. A veces las víctimas se preocupan por su futuro si se van, ya que no tienen documentos y no pueden ganar dinero para cuidar a sus hijos. Y a veces las víctimas tienen miedo de llamar a la policía, porque temen que las deporten si la policía sabe que no tienen documentos», explicó la Hermana Rosemary.

Un nuevo comienzo

Pero una vez que una víctima llega a la Casa, su vida empieza a cambiar. Es el único albergue de violencia doméstica en el área que recibe a mujeres embarazadas y brinda servicios de asesoramiento y consejos. Además, el personal de la Casa conecta a las mujeres a una variedad de recursos: capacitación para el trabajo, clases «conoce tus derechos», asistencia legal de inmigración y mucho más. Read More »

Let Them In

January 10, 2018

By Sister Ellen FitzGerald

The Sisters of Mercy stand in solidarity with our immigrant and refugee brothers and sisters. This blog post is part of week-long focus on Mercy and immigration, including historical accounts of the sisters’ roots as immigrants in the 19th century as well as a look at Mercy ministries, past and present, serving our immigrant and refugee sisters and brothers. Visit the webpage for Mercy for Immigrants to learn more.

Introduction—Looking Back

Sr. Ellen FitzGerald and Refugees

Sister Ellen FitzGerald with refugees in 1979. Credit: Mercy Heritage Center.

The essay below was originally published in December 1979 in the University of San Francisco Campus Digest, just months after President Jimmy Carter signed an executive order allowing some 13,000 refugees per month to enter the United States. Refugees were escaping the Communist regimes that had taken over Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia. They were flown on chartered aircraft to Travis Air Force Base, north of San Francisco, then bussed to San Francisco International Airport to be put on commercial flights to their final destinations—agencies all over the United States that had accepted their cases for resettlement. These agencies were scrambling to send their local staff to San Francisco to welcome the refugees, get them food, take care of emergencies, bring them to their departure gates, and so on. The agencies were understaffed, and the refugees just kept coming. Our motherhouse was just 10 minutes from the airport, and when we got the request for help, over 100 of us answered.

There were an estimated 12 million refugees in 1980. Everyone worked so earnestly to help these people and get them resettled—not just Sisters of Mercy, but governments, agencies, churches of all faith, all over the world. Today there are over 65.6 million people forcibly displaced. Do we see the same commitment? Haven’t we learned anything in the meantime?

Let Them In—An Essay on the Southeast Asian Refugee Crisis, 1979

Everyone has seen pictures of the current starvation in Cambodia, and almost everyone agrees that aid should be sent to those dying people regardless of political considerations. There is much less agreement on admitting refugees into the United States. Are we justified in adding 14,000 people a month to an economy barely able to sustain the poor we already have?

My view of the Indochinese refugees comes from volunteering at the transit camp near San Francisco International Airport where most of them enter this country. While the U.S. Catholic Conference is a major sponsor, the resettling agencies include Luther Immigration, Church World Services, World Relief and others. Their staffs and volunteers, an ecumenical lot, have all felt the unity that happens when good people of many backgrounds work together. It is the refugees who unify us, beyond culture and race, in this powerful experience of shared humanity and a common conscience. They deliver us from judgments like the ones history passes on nations who 40 years ago refused Jewish refugees. “The Family of Man,” “Unity in Diversity”—the clichés come to life. After meeting Laotians, Chinese, Vietnamese and Cambodians—so different in culture and even in features—I can never again categorize “Asians” as a group. Are these youngsters “foreigners” who act so like my own nephews? The dignified, impassive Hmong tribesmen from the mountains of Laos reveal one way of dealing with catastrophic loss; the outgoing, affectionate Vietnamese Catholics embody quite another, and bring home to me in a new way the catholicity of this Church of mine.   Read More »

Déjenlos entrar

January 10, 2018

Por la Hermana Ellen FitzGerald

Las Hermanas de la Misericordia se solidarizan con nuestros hermanos y hermanas inmigrantes y refugiados. Esta publicación blog es parte de una serie especial de publicaciones de una semana sobre la Misericordia e inmigración, que incluye relatos históricos de las raíces de las hermanas como inmigrantes en el siglo XIX, así como una mirada a los ministerios de la Misericordia, pasados y presentes, sirviendo a nuestros hermanos y hermanas inmigrantes y refugiados. ¿Deseas saber más? Visita la página Misericordia para inmigrantes.

Introducción—Una mirada atrás

Hermana Ellen FitzGerald con refugiados en 1979

Hermana Ellen FitzGerald con refugiados en 1979. Cortesía del Centro de Herencia de la Misericordia.

El escrito a continuación fue publicado originalmente en diciembre de 1979 en University of San Francisco Campus Digest, sólo meses después que el Presidente Jimmy Carter firmara una orden ejecutiva permitiendo que unos 13.000 refugiados por mes entraran a Estados Unidos. Los refugiados escapaban de regímenes comunistas que habían tomado el poder en Vietnam, Laos y Camboya. Llegaban en vuelos chárter a la Base de la Fuerza Aérea Travis al norte de San Francisco, después iban en autobús al Aeropuerto Internacional de San Francisco para vuelos a sus destinos finales: las agencias en todo Estados Unidos que habían aceptado sus casos para reasentamiento. Estas agencias tenían dificultades para enviar a su personal local a San Francisco con el propósito de dar acogida a los refugiados, llevarles comida, hacerse cargo de emergencias y guiarles a sus puertas de embarque, y así por el estilo. Las agencias no tenían suficiente personal y los refugiados sólo seguían llegando. Nuestra casa madre estaba apenas a diez minutos del aeropuerto y cuando recibimos el pedido para ayudar, más de cien entre nosotras respondimos.

En 1980 había un estimado de 12 millones de refugiados. Todo el mundo trabajó con tanto corazón para ayudar a estas personas y ver que se reubicaran, no sólo Hermanas de la Misericordia, sino gobiernos, agencias, iglesias de toda fe, de todo el mundo. Hoy, hay más de 65,6 millones de personas desplazadas por la fuerza. ¿Vemos el mismo compromiso? ¿No hemos aprendido algo entretanto?

Déjenlos entrar: Un escrito sobre la crisis de refugiados del sudeste asiático, 1979

Todo el mundo ha visto fotos de la hambruna actual en Camboya, y casi todos están de acuerdo en que se debe enviar ayuda a esas personas que están muriendo, independientemente de las consideraciones políticas. Hay mucho menos acuerdo cuando se trata de admitir refugiados en los Estados Unidos. ¿Tiene justificación el agregar 14.000 personas por mes a una economía que apenas puede sostener a los pobres que ya tenemos?

Mi visión de los refugiados indochinos proviene del voluntariado en el campamento de tránsito cerca del aeropuerto internacional de San Francisco, donde la mayoría de ellos ingresa a este país. Si bien la Conferencia Católica de los EE. UU. es una de las principales patrocinadoras, las agencias de reasentamiento incluyen Luther Immigration, Church World Services, World Relief y otras. Su personal y voluntarios, un grupo ecuménico, todos han sentido la unidad que se crea cuando buenas personas de muchos orígenes trabajan juntas. Son los refugiados quienes nos unifican, más allá de la cultura y la raza, en esta poderosa experiencia de humanidad compartida y en una conciencia común. Nos liberan de juicios como los que la historia hace sobre las naciones que hace 40 años rechazaron a los refugiados judíos. «La familia humana», «Unidad en la diversidad»: los clichés cobran vida. Después de conocer a laosianos, chinos, vietnamitas y camboyanos, tan diferentes en cultura e incluso en rasgos, nunca más puedo categorizar a los «asiáticos» como un grupo. ¿Acaso son estos jóvenes, que actúan como mis propios sobrinos, «extranjeros»? Los dignos e impasibles miembros de la tribu hmong de las montañas de Laos revelan una forma de enfrentar la pérdida catastrófica; los extrovertidos y afectuosos católicos vietnamitas encarnan otra muy distinta, y me hacen ver de una manera nueva la catolicidad de esta Iglesia mía. Read More »

St. Joseph’s Home for Working Girls: A Safe Haven in a Strange Land

January 9, 2018

By Emily Reed, digital records archivist, Mercy Heritage Center

The Sisters of Mercy stand in solidarity with our immigrant and refugee brothers and sisters. This blog post is part of week-long focus on Mercy and immigration, including historical accounts of the sisters’ roots as immigrants in the 19th century as well as a look at Mercy ministries, past and present, serving our immigrant and refugee sisters and brothers. Visit the webpage for Mercy for Immigrants to learn more.

Sister Albert Lamoureux a new St. Joseph's resident in 1988

The late Sister Albert Lamoureux welcomes a new resident in 1988. Credit: Mercy Heritage Center.

In 1895, the Sisters of Mercy established St. Joseph’s Home for Working Girls in Worcester, Massachusetts. Intended to provide an affordable space for single, working women, the home quickly became a safe haven for immigrant women. In a world where they had few rights or legal protections, immigrant women were particularly vulnerable, as they arrived in the United States without social or economic support.

Throughout American history, women have been subject to laws limiting their abilities to work, own property or have full determination over the course of their own lives. In 1895, when St. Joseph’s Home was established, the right to vote was 25 years in the future. Education could be difficult to obtain, and women had limited control over finances. Most careers and professions were off-limits. Immigrant women were, and continue to be, particularly vulnerable to such discrimination, since they lacked the resources, both economic and social, needed to overcome or circumvent such discrimination. On their own in a country where opportunities were limited for women, St. Joseph’s Home provided a place for immigrant women to establish themselves, save money and stay safe in an unfamiliar land.   Read More »

Hogar de San José para Mujeres: Un lugar seguro en una tierra desconocida

January 9, 2018

Por Emily Reed, Centro de Herencia de la Misericordia

Las Hermanas de la Misericordia se solidarizan con nuestros hermanos y hermanas inmigrantes y refugiados. Esta publicación blog es parte de una serie especial de publicaciones de una semana sobre la Misericordia e inmigración, que incluye relatos históricos de las raíces de las hermanas como inmigrantes en el siglo XIX, así como una mirada a los ministerios de la Misericordia, pasados y presentes, sirviendo a nuestros hermanos y hermanas inmigrantes y refugiados. ¿Deseas saber más? Visita la página Misericordia para inmigrantes.

Sister Albert Lamoureux a new St. Joseph's resident in 1988

La difunta Hermana Albert Lamoureux da la bienvenida a una nueva residente en 1988. Cortesía del Centro de Herencia de la Misericordia.

En 1895, las Hermanas de la Misericordia establecieron el Hogar de San José para Mujeres en Worcester, Massachusetts. Proyectado con el fin de proporcionar un espacio asequible para trabajadoras solteras, rápidamente el hogar se convirtió en un lugar seguro para mujeres inmigrantes. En un mundo donde poseían muy pocos derechos o protección legal, las mujeres inmigrantes estaban particularmente en situaciones vulnerables, ya que llegaban a Estados Unidos sin apoyo social o económico.

A través de la historia estadounidense, las mujeres han estado sujetas a leyes que limitan su capacidad para trabajar, tener una propiedad o resolución plena en el curso de sus vidas. En 1895, cuando se estableció el Hogar de San José, el derecho al voto transcurriría en 25 años. Obtener una educación podía ser difícil y las mujeres tenían control limitado en las finanzas. La mayor parte de las carreras y profesiones estaban fuera del alcance. Las mujeres inmigrantes eran vulnerables particularmente a la discriminación y continúan siéndolo, ya que carecían de recursos, económicos y sociales, requeridos para superar o eludir tal discriminación. Por su cuenta, en un país donde se limitaban las oportunidades para las mujeres, el Hogar de San José proporcionó un lugar para que las mujeres inmigrantes se establecieran, ahorraran dinero y vivieran seguras en una tierra desconocida. Read More »

Mercy for Immigrants: 1850s-1870s

Looking Back: Mercy in a Time of Fear

January 8, 2018

By Betsy Johnson, assistant archivist, Mercy Heritage Center

The Sisters of Mercy stand in solidarity with our immigrant and refugee brothers and sisters. This blog post is part of week-long focus on Mercy and immigration, including historical accounts of the sisters’ roots as immigrants in the 19th century as well as a look at Mercy ministries, past and present, serving our immigrant and refugee sisters and brothers. Visit the webpage for Mercy for Immigrants to learn more.

Mother Frances Warde's Traveling Trunk

Mother Frances Warde’s traveling trunk. Credit: Mercy Heritage Center

The following story is taken from The Leaves of the Annals, the first history of the Sisters of Mercy, written by Mother Teresa Austin Carroll, published in 1888.

The 19th century was a time of anti-immigrant attitudes and movements in America, particularly in New England. As Irish Catholic immigrants began to settle in the region, they felt the effects of fear and discrimination. Catholic sisters often served as the frontline in providing social services to the newest Americans, but few were able to risk the dangers inherent to moving into hostile communities.

In 1851, the Sisters of Mercy were invited to found a community in Providence, Rhode Island. In this time of rabid anti-immigrant, anti-Catholic sentiment in the United States, Mother Frances Warde knew that establishing a new foundation was a dangerous decision for the community. In nearby Charlestown, Massachusetts, rioters had burned down a convent and school run by Ursuline sisters in 1834. Understanding the risks, Mother Frances led the small group to Providence herself. Knowing they could face harassment and abuse on the streets, she instructed the sisters to pack up their habits and travel in secular dress to establish their new convent.   Read More »

En retrospectiva: La Misericordia en tiempos de temor

January 8, 2018

Por Betsy Johnson, asistenta de archivos, Centro de Herencia de la Misericordia

Las Hermanas de la Misericordia se solidarizan con nuestros hermanos y hermanas inmigrantes y refugiados. Esta publicación blog es parte de una serie especial de publicaciones de una semana sobre la Misericordia e inmigración, que incluye relatos históricos de las raíces de las hermanas como inmigrantes en el siglo XIX, así como una mirada a los ministerios de la Misericordia, pasados y presentes, sirviendo a nuestros hermanos y hermanas inmigrantes y refugiados. ¿Deseas saber más? Visita la página Misericordia para inmigrantes.

Baúl de viaje de la Madre Frances Warde

Baúl de viaje de la Madre Frances Warde. Cortesía del Centro de Herencia de la Misericordia

La siguiente historia fue recopilada de The Leaves of the Annals, la primera historia de las Hermanas de la Misericordia, escrita por la Madre Teresa Austin Carroll, publicada en 1888.

El siglo XIX fue una época de actitudes y movimientos contra los inmigrantes en Estados Unidos, en particular en New England. A medida que inmigrantes católicos irlandeses comenzaron a establecerse en la región, sintieron los efectos del temor y la discriminación. Frecuentemente, las hermanas católicas servían en primera fila en la prestación de servicios sociales a las personas que acababan de convertirse en estadounidenses, pero muy pocas podían arriesgar los peligros inherentes al movilizarse en las comunidades hostiles.

En 1851, las Hermanas de la Misericordia fueron invitadas a fundar una comunidad en Providence, Rhode Island. En esta época del virulento sentimiento antiinmigrante, anticatólico en los Estados Unidos, la Madre Frances Warde sabía que establecer una nueva fundación sería una decisión peligrosa para la comunidad. En el cercano Charlestown, Massachusetts, los agitadores quemaron un convento y una escuela dirigida por las hermanas Ursulinas en 1834. Comprendiendo los riesgos, la Madre Frances llevó personalmente al pequeño grupo a Providence. Sabiendo que podían enfrentar acosamientos y abusos en las calles, aleccionó a las hermanas a empacar sus hábitos y viajar en vestimenta seglar para establecer su nuevo convento. Read More »

Walking the Journey with Pediatric Patients and Families

January 4, 2018

By Amanda LePoire

Sister Judy Carron caring for a baby

Sister Judy Carron meets with a family whose sons are undergoing treatment at Cardinal Glennon Children’s Hospital in St. Louis, Missouri. As coordinator for the hospital’s Footprints program, Sister Judy supports families whose children are being treated for complex medical issues.

Sister Judy Carron wasn’t interested in religious life until she felt drawn to it while working “hand in hand” with the Sisters of Mercy as a student nurse at St. John’s Hospital in St. Louis, Missouri. Today, Sister Judy walks hand in hand with pediatric patients and families on a long, difficult journey.

In 1979, Sister Judy combined her experience as a pediatric nurse and a hospital chaplain when she joined the Pastoral Care Department at Cardinal Glennon Children’s Hospital in St. Louis. During her tenure as chairperson of the hospital’s Ethics Committee, the committee realized patients and families needed more services related to palliative and end-of-life care. A focus group of parents gave the committee the direction for what would become the Footprints program, where Sister Judy has ministered since its inception in 1999.

Poem Inspired Name

“They said they needed someone to walk the journey with them,” Sister Judy recalls. With a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Footprints was born and named for the well-known poem “Footprints in the Sand” by Mary Stevenson. An interdisciplinary team, including doctors, nurses and pastoral care staff, offers physical, emotional and spiritual support to children facing complex and terminal illnesses and to their families.

“The journey is a hard journey, it’s a scary journey,” Sister Judy says. “We’re an extra layer of support for them.”   Read More »